Hello all! I'm Melissa. 21 year old from New Jersey. You can usually find me crying over: Supernatural, Elementary, Teen Wolf, and the Mets.

 

elementarystan:

LA Times: Elementary deduces the painful truth at the heart of sobriety
Very few shows could pull off a homage to the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman without seeming exploitative, sensational or culturally carnivorous. Only one could do it in the middle of an episode dealing with a bunch of missing anthrax and Garret Dillahunt as a dairy farmer.
"Elementary" has its share of pivotal moments, but they are invariably underplayed, woven into crime-solving story lines that allow the larger narrative to emerge with surprising power. It may be the best portrait of recovery on television.
Sobriety is not the point of “Elementary”; the deductive powers and social ineptitude of its famous lead and his relationship with Watson are what drive the show.
But the addiction, at first obvious then oblique in Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories, has always been what made Sherlock Holmes a man rather than a machine; it’s what drew “Elementary” creator Rob Doherty to the character in the first place.
Hoffman’s death, Doherty said in an interview, seemed impossible to ignore because it allowed the writers to put Sherlock “in the position to ask some of the questions many people were asking … to make the point that addiction does not discriminate.”
"His relapsing doesn’t change a thing for you, not one single thing. You woke up today, you didn’t use drugs, just like yesterday. You know what you have to do tomorrow? Wake up and not use drugs. That is just how it is. That is how it’s going to be."

elementarystan:

LA Times: Elementary deduces the painful truth at the heart of sobriety

Very few shows could pull off a homage to the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman without seeming exploitative, sensational or culturally carnivorous. Only one could do it in the middle of an episode dealing with a bunch of missing anthrax and Garret Dillahunt as a dairy farmer.

"Elementary" has its share of pivotal moments, but they are invariably underplayed, woven into crime-solving story lines that allow the larger narrative to emerge with surprising power. It may be the best portrait of recovery on television.

Sobriety is not the point of “Elementary”; the deductive powers and social ineptitude of its famous lead and his relationship with Watson are what drive the show.

But the addiction, at first obvious then oblique in Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories, has always been what made Sherlock Holmes a man rather than a machine; it’s what drew “Elementary” creator Rob Doherty to the character in the first place.

Hoffman’s death, Doherty said in an interview, seemed impossible to ignore because it allowed the writers to put Sherlock “in the position to ask some of the questions many people were asking … to make the point that addiction does not discriminate.

"His relapsing doesn’t change a thing for you, not one single thing. You woke up today, you didn’t use drugs, just like yesterday. You know what you have to do tomorrow? Wake up and not use drugs. That is just how it is. That is how it’s going to be."

Anonymous asked
I love the idea of Stiles calling Derek baby and Derek pretending to be all grumpy about it but secretly he really loves it!

stilinskisparkles:

totally.

i like thinking about Derek pretending his ears didn’t prick up the moment Stiles parked the Jeep in their spot in the apartment parking lot. like he isn’t listening to him on the stairs and feeling bright and excited that Stiles is home. i like imagining Stiles always grinning when he comes in the door and sees Derek poised for his entrance, and make a crack about Derek’s metaphorical tail wagging. Derek scowling and blustering like “no, i was just preparing myself for the onslaught of noise” and not meaning it at all because he gets this little running commentary stilesiscomingstilesiscomingstilesishome as the door opens. 

Stiles’ number is saved in his phone as home. Derek relishes the fact he has a home, and even when they move to a house, with a land line, Stiles stays stored in his contacts as home. and Stiles steals his phone all the time and updates his contact pictures, not just Stiles’, but Scott’s to one of Scott asleep upside down on the couch, Allison eating pie and glaring at anyone daring to get close, Isaac in the scarf section in Macy’s and his face DEEPLY EXCITED. so Derek never knows what picture’s going to show up when people call, and he gets to roll his eyes fondly when anyone sees the picture, smile goofily and say “my family” as he waves his phone around. 

or when he pretends he doesn’t appreciate Stiles draping himself all over Derek in the evenings. or steals pieces of chicken or pepper whilst Derek’s preparing food. or when Stiles forgets himself and calls Derek baby in front of people, and Derek’s ears are burning the whole time but he still feels warm inside because yes, he is! he’s someone’s person. someone needs him and wants him as much as he needs and wants them. 

and it’s just nice. to have a life. even if Stiles constantly sticks his cold feet under Derek’s legs and makes him hiss, and never lets Derek watch a movie in the dark without needing some sort of laptop or ipad screen on (he can’t do two things at once, most often his alternative is to casually grope Derek throughout the movie, Derek still can’t tell you what happens at the end of half the movies they’ve watched, just nods and hums when the pack get into discussion about them). 

hungrylikethewolfie:

mechinaries:

i imagine both steve and bucky like to come up with different ways to poke fun at sam every time they pass him during jogging

because they are shitheads

(the first one is a print you can get here)

This is one of my new favorite things, omg